• Tuesday, July 23rd, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    “Achilles’ heel” 

    Answer the following questions (in complete sentences in your composition book): 

    1. What is this expression called? (Hint: It is a literature term.) 
    1. What is the literal meaning of “Achilles’ heel? 
    1. Why are these expressions important to our (American) culture?  

    An idiom is “[a] mode expression peculiar to a language; peculiarity of expression or phraseology” (Webster’s Dictionary 1828). In addition, “the word idiom comes from the Greek root idio, meaning a unique signature” (E.D. Hirsch).  

    Activities: 

    Introduction: 

    • What do you know about Mr. Burns? 
    • What questions do you have for me about the class? 

    Syllabus: 

    • Read it 
    • Signed by your parent/guardian and due by the beginning of class on Friday. 

    Homework: Parent Night at 6pm  

    Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    In your own words, define an idiom based on yesterday’s discussion and journal entry.  

    Activities: 

    Materials needed are pencil, composition book, syllabus, and nameplate. Finish discussing the syllabus as a group.  

    ACT Reading Pre-Assessment 

    • Timed-35 minutes 
    • Complete the entire test. 
    • Collecting Data.  

    Homework: Syllabus due Friday; Parents’ Night at 6pm 

     Thursday, July 25th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    Other idioms are really allusions or foreign-language terms that make no sense unless you know what the allusions or terms mean. In your own words, write the definition of an allusion based on the discussion from Monday and Tuesday.  

    Activities: 

    ACT English Pre-Assessment 

    • Timed-45 minutes 
    • Complete the entire test. 
    • Collecting Data 

    Homework: Syllabus due tomorrow 

     Friday, July 26th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal):  

    Journal check-keep out your journal so I can check it while you are writing.  

    Activities: 

    Syllabus due 

    Argumentative Pre-Writing Assessment due by the end of the period. 

    • Select one of the following argumentative writing prompts: 
    • In Abraham Lincoln’s speech titled “The Gettysburg Address” he says,”--that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Are our governments (federal, state, or local) still working towards the needs of its people?  
    • In Francis Bacon’s essay Of Truth he writes, “What is truth? Said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer” suggesting that people do not care about the truth. Should people care about the truth?  
    • Show brainstorming and self-editing. 
    • 600-word count 

    Homework: Syllabi due Monday if you didn’t hand it in. 

     

    Monday, July 29th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    What is your issue for the Basha Gives Back project? Why did you choose this issue? 

    Activities: 

    Grade ACT Reading and English sections 

    Scale Score 

    Question of the Week: 

    • Is it ethical (morally right) to use a person’s emotions to persuade him or her? [Participation points] 
    • Write your response to the question in your composition notebook underneath the response to the bell-work.  

    Reading 

    • Begin reading Aristotle’s Rhetoric, or Art of Rhetoric, or Treatise on Rhetoric 

    Homework: None 

    Tuesday, July 30th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    How do you usually persuade others (friends, family, or teachers)? Be specific. Provide details (examples/experiences, observations).  

    Activities: 

    What is rhetoric?  

    Question of the Week: 

    • Is it ethical (morally right) to use a person’s emotions to persuade him or her? [Participation points] 

    Read Book I Chapter One of Aristotle's Rhetoric (translated version) 

    Homework: None 

    Wednesday, July 31st, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    Re-write the following sentence with the correct punctuation(s): In 1788 the King’s advisers warned him that the nation was facing bankruptcy therefore he summoned a body called the States-General believing that it would authorize him to levy new taxes.  

    Explain why you included that punctuation(s) in the sentence 

    Activities: 

    Discuss the Question of the Week 

    Aristotle’s Rhetoric 

    • We are reading the notes of Aristotle from Aristotle’s students. In addition, we are stepping into the mind of Aristotle. (Write your response in the journal.) 
    • What idea(s) is/are Aristotle teaching you, in the first three paragraphs?  
    • Continue reading Book I Chapter I 

    Homework: None 

    Thursday, August 1st, 2019 

    Bell-work(journal): 

    Re-write the following sentence with the correct punctuation(s): The people of France however were suffering from burdensome taxation oppressive social injustice and acute scarcity of food and their representatives refused to consider projects of taxation until social and economic reforms should be granted.  

    Explain why you included that punctuation(s) in the sentence—why did you include it in the revised version? 

    Activities: 

    Discuss Question-of-the-Week 

    Aristotle’s Rhetoric 

    • Finish reading Book I Chapter I (3rd and 6th) 
    • Start reading Book I Chapter II (5th) 

    Start Planning for your Impromptu Speech (Speeches start Wednesday (6th Hour) or Thursday (3rd and 5th Hour) 

    1. Decide on a topic. 
    1. 3 supportive statements related to your topic. 
    1. Strong conclusion 

    Today you must decide on one of the following topics: 

    1. My biggest concern for the future. 2. Advice for Little Red Riding Hood. 3. An important life lesson I’ve learned. 4. Wisdom vs. Intelligence. 5. Uniforms smothers individuality. 6. High salaries of athletes, actors, etc. 7. If I were the president, I would... 8. The most successful person you know. 9. Why is sense of humor important? 10. “Normal” is decided by society.  

    Alternative Assignment: If you do “feel” comfortable presenting an impromptu speech, you will need to write your speech and have it completed by Wednesday (6th Hour) or Thursday (3rd and 5th Hours).  

    Monday, August 5th, 2019 

    Bell-work (journal): 

    Question-of-the-Week: When you hear the word “classical” what are the first things that come to your mind? Why is it hard to love “classical” things (when you know you should love them)? What could be a potential consequence of not loving things that last? Please answer all three questions.  

    Activities: 

    Journal Set-Up 

    Common Greek/Latin Root of the Week 

    Impromptu Speeches: 

    • 3 supportive statements related to your topic (don’t lie) 
    • Mr. Burns’ impromptu speech 
    • Plan your strong conclusion 

    What does Bruce Lee, C.S. Lewis, and King Solomon have in common? Each have provided wisdom on how words can impact others in a positive or negative way.  

    Most of our life lessons are life lessons experienced by others; we are not unique, and our problems are not unique. In the following seconds I will share with you, wisdom from three men about how words have impacted our lives. First, Bruce Lee utters the same proverbial insight about how to react to words: “You will continue to suffer if you have an emotional reaction to everything that is said to you. True power is sitting back and observing everything with logic. If words control you that means everyone else can control you. Breathe and allow things to pass.” I agree. Next, C.S. Lewis spoke about how to use your words at the right time: “Spiteful words can hurt your feelings, but silence breaks your heart.” Finally, King Solomon concludes this proverbial wisdom by stating: “For the Lord gives wisdom: From His mouth come knowledge and understanding.”  

    Lee preaches to not suffer over the words spoken to you. Lewis may be contradicting Lee’s words, but still hangs onto the point of spiteful words can emotionally harm, but you must speak up. King Solomon would also say to speak up, but may it not be spiteful or hurtful words, but words filled with knowledge and understanding. Words can hurt but words can also inspire. Make your mouth be full of truth and love.  

     

    Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    1. Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate.  
    1. The fact that we will be playing for the Big Ten championship should really commove the crowd. 

    Based on how to condescend and commove are used in each sentence, guess the meanings. 

    Activities: 

    Question-of-the-Week Responses:  

    • When you hear the word “classical” what are the first things that come to your mind? Why is it hard to love “classical” things (when you know you should love them)? What could be a potential consequence of not loving things that last? Please answer all three questions. 

    Growing Roots 

    • Complete Section 2 (5-minutes) 

    Argument Builder 

    • Read 
    • Complete Activity 
    • Discuss 

    Homework: Impromptu Speeches due tomorrow 

     

    Block Days 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Between March and November of 2011, an anonymous donor left intricately crafted paper sculptures at the various cultural institution in Edinburgh, Scotland.  

    Would you keep the word “intricately” or would you change it? If you change it, what word you replace it with?  

    Activities: 

    Question-of-the-Week Responses:  

    Words with the roots com or con that are part of American/British Literature or the subject of Literature/English. 

    Complete Section 2 and Section 3 of “Growing Roots” Worksheet 

    Argument Builder (First page titled “Introduction”) 

    • Define Logic, Rhetoric, Sophists, and Common Topics (in your own words). 
    • Research Demosthenes, Protagoras, Gorgias, Isocrates, Quintilian, and Cicero 

    Cell-phone Break (8-minutes) 

    Argument Builder (First page titled “Introduction”) 

    • Discuss Definitions and Greek and Roman Rhetoricians 
    • Complete sections titled “Consider” and “Describe” on page 11 
    • Discuss 

    Impromptu Speeches Presentations 

    Impromptu Speeches Reflection 

    • What irrefutable (proven) facts did you use in your speech? 
    • What refutable facts (argued against) did you use in your speech? 
    • How did Aristotle’s Rhetoric Part I influence your speech? (Provide details. Refer to text to support your answer(s).) 

    Friday, August 9th, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Check your composition books at the end of class. 

    Activities: 

    Mr. Burns response to the Question-of-the-Week 

    Any impromptu speeches not presented on Wednesday or Thursday? 

    Impromptu Speeches Reflection 

    • What irrefutable (proven) facts did you use in your speech? 
    • What refutable facts (argued against) did you use in your speech? 
    • How did Aristotle’s Rhetoric Part I influence your speech? (Provide details. Refer to text to support your answer(s).) 
    • What grade do you deserve for the Impromptu speech? Why?  

    Discussion Question:  

    • Complete sections titled “Consider” and “Describe” on page 11 
    • Checking composition books during this time 

    Sticky Notes 

    • Write a metaphor or a simile describing how knowledgeable you are on Aristotle’s Rhetoric and the concepts/terms discussed in the sample readings from Shelly Johnson’s Argument Builder. 

    Monday, August 12th, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Question-of-the-Week: Do Americans truly have the right to speak our beliefs, our values, our mind (freedom of speech) without restrictions or limitsWhy or why not? (Argument for or against the 1st Amendment) 

    Activities: 

    History of Latin 

    Common Roots of the Week: 

    • Hypo-under 

    Word of the Week 

    • Hypocritically means “with stimulation; with a false appearance of what tis good; falsely; without sincerity” (Webster’s Dictionary 1828).    
    • Now that you know the definition of hypocritical use it in a sentence.  

    “On Wrecking Books to Bring Them to Life” by David Kern 

    • Discuss: Do you agree or disagree with the process described in the article? To effectively comprehend or communicate with a novel, a book, an article, or any text you need to “wreck it”?  

    Tuesday, August 13th, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Point out and correct the faults in the following sentences:  

    1. My farm consisted of about twenty acres of excellent land, having given a hundred pounds for my predecessor’s lease.  
    1. Pale and swooning, with two broken legs, they carried him into the house.  

    Activities: 

    QOW 

    Picture Day 

    3rd: 9:45am; 5th: 12:25; 6th: 1:45 

    “On Wrecking Books to Bring Them to Life” by David Kern 

    • Discuss: Do you agree or disagree with the process described in the article? To effectively comprehend or communicate with a novel, a book, an article, or any text you need to “wreck it”? 

    Introduction to the Declaration of Independence 

    • Declaration 
    • Independence 

    Introduction about writing your own declaration 

    First read of The Declaration of Independence 

    Wednesday/Thursday, August 14th/15, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Describe to me how independent you are as a student, as a teenager, as a male or female, and as a son or daughter 

    Activities: 

    QOW 

    First read discussion 

    Group read The Declaration of Independence  

    Group roles 

    Cell phone break 

    Writing your own declaration  

    Brainstorm, Pre-write, Edit, Peer Review, Final Draft 

    Friday, August 16th, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Bell-work check: Question-of-the-Week, Grammar Activity, and Independence prompt 

    Activities: 

    Oddball Friday 

    Continue writing your personal declaration 

     

    Monday, August 19th, 2019 

    • Bell-Work (composition book): 
    • What do you want your legacy to be after you pass away? (5-7 sentences) 
    • Activities: 
    • Growing Roots 
    • Inter 
    • A Declaration 
    • Rough Draft finished? 
    • Peer Reviewed? 
    • Final Draft due tomorrow 

    Tuesday, August 20th, 2019 

    • Bell-work (composition book): 
    • Diction refers to a writer’s choice and arrangement of words. It creates a writer’s style and it reveals the writer’s purpose or reason for writing.  
    • “What a weekend! Boy, am I beat! First, we went to the amusement park. As usual, the main amusement was Uncle Herman. He kept us laughing all the way there with his silly hip-hop-don’t-stop-till-you-drop rapping. Then, we went to see the new Tornado Girl movie. I can’t help it--I think Tornado Girl rules!” 
    • Give two examples from the passage that support the claim that this is written in informal diction. In addition, change the passage to express formal diction.  
    • Activities: 
    • Question of the Week 
    • Growing Roots Worksheet 
    • A Declaration due today 
    • 2:30 pm (extension) 
    • Read and Discuss 

     

     

    Wednesday or Thursday, August 21st or 22nd, 2019 

    Bell-work (composition book): 

    Creative (fiction) writing prompt: (10-minutes to write the story) 

    1. Phyllis Nightingale instantly thought of a C.S. Lewis’s quote that said, “Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.”  
    1. As Mr. Burns feverishly searched the internet, looking for the perfect quotation for this lesson, he landed on a quote from John Adams that read: “Liberty once lost, is lost forever.”  

    Select one of the following opening lines of a story and finish it.  

    Activities: 

    Question-of-the-Week responses 

    Complete the “Growing Roots” worksheet (8-minutes) 

    Find the root “inter” in the reading: “Letter to John” 

    Continue reading and wrecking “Letter to John” by Abigail Adams 

    Discuss what we read using the discussion questions the class created. 

    Write a letter to your future self about the history unfolding right now (August 21st or 22nd, 2019) and any concerns you about your future self (May 2020).  

    ***What is the history unfolding currently and what are some concerns concerning you right now that you want fixed by the end of the year?  

    • 2 paragraphs 
    • Formal diction in the first paragraph and informal diction in the second paragraph. 

     

    Friday, August 23rd, 2019 

    • 3rd Period: People still need to respond to the Question of the Week 
    • Mr. Burns’ response to the Question of the Week 
    • Composition Book Check for this Week:  
    • Monday: Question of the Week 
    • Tuesday: Informal Diction example 
    • Block Day: Creative (fiction) writing  

     

    Monday, August 26th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Question-of-the-Week: What is moral relativism and what is its significance or importance? Who decides morality and why? 

    • Your response should be 2 paragraphs in length. The first paragraph defines moral relativism and its significance. The second paragraph discusses your argument for who decides morality and why. 

    Activities:

    Anticipation Guide 

    • Agree or Disagree Statements
    • “Deep Thoughts” response for one statement and it must be 200 words or more
    • One person must respond to your “Deep Thoughts” journal entry

    Arthur Miller

    • Who is the man?
    • McCarthyism
    • Blacklisting in Hollywood
    • Religious Intolerance

    The Crucible 

    • Vocabulary

     

    Tuesday, August 27th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Formal Diction Example: Albert Einstein was known as the man who discovered relativity or E=Mc2. Unfortunately, most modern thinkers do not know that Einstein divorced his wife to marry his younger second cousin. Then modern thinkers would suggest that brilliant men have their flaws. Does Einstein's flaw still make him a brilliant individual or do he flaws make him less of man? 

    1. What is diction?
    2. Why is the example an example of formal diction? Provide evidence from the paragraph to support your claim.
    3. Write the paragraph informally or using casual language. 

    Activities:

    Question-of-the-Week

    Growing Roots Worksheet

    Arthur Miller

    • Who is the man?
    • McCarthyism
    • Blacklisting in Hollywood
    • Religious Intolerance

    The Crucible 

    • Vocabulary

    The Crucible Act I

    • Read and Discuss

    Wednesday/Thursday, 28th/29th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Tell me a story. Either a scary story (real or not); an interesting true story about something that happened in your life; or a story you heard from a friend or a relative. Keep it PG or PG-13. No nudity or swearing

    Activities:

    Junior Credit Checks:

    • 12:23-1:15 F217 6th Hour
    • 9:50-10:40 F217 3rd Hour
    • 12:23-1:15 C201 5th Hour

    Growing Roots Worksheet

    The Crucible Act I

    • Read and Discuss

     

    Friday, August 30th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Journal Check:

    • Question-of-The-Week must be completed. 2 paragraphs in length.
    • Formal diction-evidence to prove its formal diction and you have re-written the paragraph informally.
    • Wrote a story

    Activities:

    Mr. Burns’ response to QOW

    Oddball Friday’s

    • Read Human Beauty
    • Discuss 

    Week 7

    Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):
    1. One of the themes of “The Crucible” is “Intolerance” or more specifically “Intolerance of Religion”. What does intolerance or more specifically intolerance of religion mean? 

    1. What is a point in time when a group was persecuted based on their religious beliefs or any beliefs? -Or- Have you had your own personal experience where you were persecuted based on your beliefs? 

    Activities:

    Unit 1 Test on Friday

    Question

    • What kind of play are we reading? How do you know that? 

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • Continue reading Act I
    • As we read, you must complete the Wrecking the Text worksheet. 

     

    Wednesday/Thursday, September 4th/5th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Part I: What is a proverb? What’s a proverb’s importance in literature? 

    Part II: Select one of the following proverbs that you will have to memorize by Friday:

    1. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry. 
    2. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. 
    3. Laugh, and the world laughs with you; weep, and you weep alone. 

    You’ll be given either a score of 5 or a score of 10. A score of 5 means you memorized about half of it; a score of 10 means you memorized it completely. 

    Activities:

    ACT Reading Passages Pre

    • Tricks and Tips
    • 8 minutes and 30 seconds to complete

    Cell-phone Break 

    • 8-minutes

    Question from yesterday

    • What kind of play are we reading? How do you know that? 

    The Crucible

    • Continue reading Act I
    • Watch the beginning part of the movie (1996)

     

    Friday, September 6th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Mr. Burns’ response to the Question-of-the-Week

    Activities:

    Proverb Memorization Activity

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • Continue reading Act I
    • Discuss Act II
      • Wrecking the Text

    Composition Book Check

    • Tuesday: Question-of-the-Week; What kind of play are we reading? How do you know that?
    • Block Day: What is a proverb? What’s a proverb’s importance in literature? 

    Week 8

    Monday, September 9th, 2019

    Bell-work (composition book):

    Philosophical-Question of the Week: What harsh truth do you prefer to ignore? Why? 

    7-MINUTES TO COMPLETE

    Activities:

    Proverb Memorization Activity 

    • 10 points possible

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • Mr. Burns gives his classes many concessions, but one demand I will not grant them is the use of their electronic devices during whole-class reading! (Re-write the sentence and define the underlined word)
    • Continue and finish reading ACT I
    • Discussion

    Narrative Writing for Informational Research Paperconc

    • What’s your Basha Gives Back topic?
    • Complete the Quick-write: Why this topic? What inspired you? 

    Tuesday, September 10th, 2019

    Bell-work:

    Grammar/Vocabulary: Finding an contingent plan were Mr. Burns only options. 

    1. Edit the sentence. 2. What do you think the word contingent means? 

    Mr. Burns’ only option was finding a contingency plan.  

    Activities:

    Question-of-the-Week Responses

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • Finish Act I
    • Discuss Act I
      • What do you think? What don’t you get? 

    BGB Prewriting and Brainstorming Guide

    • Complete “Getting Started” section
    • Complete “Integrating Research” section

    Wednesday/Thursday, September 11th/12th, 2019

    Bell-work:

    In writing, vividly describe Mr. Burns attending a Kanye West concert. (Descriptive Writing) 

    Activities:

    Question-of-the-Week Responses

    Roots Review

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • Act II
    • Wrecking the Movie Notes
      • I will collect Wrecking the Movie Notes by the end of the discussion.
    • No cell-phone use during the film
      • Pop quiz!

    Cell-phone Break (8-minutes)

    BGB Prewriting and Brainstorming Guide

    • Complete “Getting Started” section
    • Start writing Rough Draft


    Week 9

    Monday, September 16h, 2019

    Week 9

    Bell-work:

    Question of the Week:

    What are the real evil deeds or actions of typical people (on a daily basis)? 

    Activities:

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    Act III

    • Scene Re-Enactment 
    • Groups of 4
    • Rubric: Movement/Blocking, Memorization, Diction, and Focus

    BGB Research Paper Introduction

    • Narrative Rough Draft

    Reminders:

    Roots Test tomorrow

    Rough Draft due tomorrow

    Tuesday, September 17th, 2019

    Bell-work:

    Attach the floating quote or introduce the quotation into a sentence Page # is 55:

    “No more! I should have roared you down when first you told me your suspicion. But I wilted, and, like a Christian, I confessed. Confessed! Some dream I had must have mistaken you for God that day. But you’re not, you’re not, and let you remember it! Let you look sometimes for the goodness in me, and judge me not.”

    Activities:

    Roots Test (15-minutes)

    BGB Research paper Introduction 

    • Narrative Rough Draft due
    • New Final Draft Due Date: September 24th, 2019

    The Crucible Act III Re-enactment

    • Meet with groups (20 minutes)

     

    Mr. Burns’ examples:

    While John and Elizabeth are in the heat of an argument, John shouts, “No more! I should have roared you down when first you told me your suspicion. But I wilted, and, like a Christian, I confessed. Confessed! Some dream I had must have mistaken you for God that day. But you’re not, you’re not, and let you remember it! Let you look sometimes for the goodness in me, and judge me not” (Miller 55). 

     

    In the dramatic play “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller, Miller wrote, “No more! I should have roared you down when first you told me your suspicion. But I wilted, and, like a Christian, I confessed. Confessed! Some dream I had must have mistaken you for God that day. But you’re not, you’re not, and let you remember it! Let you look sometimes for the goodness in me, and judge me not” (55). 

     

    John, like most men, want to “roar” at their wives, when they are wrong, but “like a Christian” he “wilted” and “confessed”. Unfortunately, he wasn’t confessing to God, he was confessing to Elizabeth he “mistaken...for God that day” (Miller 55). 



    Wednesday/Thursday, September 18th/19th, 2019

    Bell-work:

    Quote:---->"He who is not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins. For unreasonable pateience is the hotbed of many vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked but the good to do wrong." 

    Author: John Chrysostom

    Page #: Not available 

    Type of Writing: Argumentative

    Topic: The Role of Anger in Our Lives

    Prompt: Argue why anger or wrath is a necessary and positive part of human behavior. 

    Thesis: Create a Thesis based on the prompt

    Objective: First, write a thesis. Then write an argumentative paragraph about the thesis and use the quotation from the painting as your piece of evidence. Make sure to introduce the quotation into a sentence. 

     

    Activities:

    Question of the Week Responses

    Method #1

    • When + Who + Said, “Quote” (Author’s Last Name Page #). 

    Argumentative Writing

    • Everyone in the town thinks the real evil deeds going on in the village involves witchcraft, but the true evil deeds are certain sinful actions of the villagers. Describe to me the sinful actions of the Salem villagers. Support your answers with textual evidence from Act I or Act II or Act III. Present your responses to the class. 

    Cell-Phone Break (8-minutes)

    Act III Re-enactment Practice Time

    Mr. Burns’ example:

    My thesis: 

    Anger or wrath is a necessary and positive part of human anger because humans who conceal their unreasonable patience will suffer. 

    My paragraph: 

    (Topic Sentence) Humans who conceal their unreasonable patience will suffer and injustices will prosper. (Evidence) Archbishop and Saint John Chrysostom spoke out against injustices in his lifetime. Injustices which lead him to a necessary human behaviors: anger or wrath. During his time as Archbishop of Constantinople, he vehemently sermonized about how men “who” are “not angry, whereas he has cause to be, sins” and “unreasonable patience is the hotbed for vices, it fosters negligence, and incites not only the wicked, but the good to do wrong” (Chrysostom). (Commentary) As you can infer, Chrysostom believed people who did not speak up against evil would suffer consequences. Consequences that frankly would do harm to the individual’s soul and harm to humanity. Unreasonable patience or wrath or anger kept leashed or concealed must be let loose so injustices can be courageously and virtuously defeated.