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ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments, Chapter 5: Website Accessibility Under Title II of the ADA. 


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Tagged PDF files make it easier for screen readers and other assistive technologies to determine a logical reading order and navigation for the file, as well as allowing for content reflow when using large type displays, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and mobile phones. This tagging can be done automatically when you save a file as PDF format starting in Microsoft Office 2007 versions of Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, Visio, or Word. 


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A customizable quick reference to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 requirements (success criteria) and techniques. 


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This document indicates specific techniques to meet each Success Criterion. Details for how to implement each technique are available in Techniques for WCAG 2.0, but "Understanding WCAG 2.0" provides the information about the relationship of each technique to the Success Criteria. Techniques are categorized by the level of support they provide for the Success Criteria.

In addition to techniques for addressing the success criteria, "Common Failures" are also documented. 


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WAVE is developed and made available as a free community service by WebAIM. Originally launched in 2001, WAVE has been used to evaluate the accessibility of millions of web pages. 


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WCAG 2.0 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity and combinations of these. Following these guidelines will also often make your Web content more usable to users in general. 


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The WCAG documents explain how to make web content more accessible to people with disabilities. Web "content" generally refers to the information in a web page or web application, including:
  • natural information such as text, images, and sounds
  • code or markup that defines structure, presentation, etc.
 


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The following is NOT the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. It is, however, a simple checklist that presents our recommendations for implementing HTML-related principles and techniques for those seeking WCAG 2.0 conformance. The language used here is quite different from the official WCAG 2.0 specification to make it easier to implement and verify for web pages. 


 

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